THE HOURGLASS MAP

(november 2020)

CURRENT TITLES

THE ART OF BEING DIFFERENT

ST MICHAEL’S GRAMMAR SCHOOL

In 1895, armed with their faith and their wits, the enterprising Sisters of the Community of the Church opened a tiny Anglican school at Marlton Crescent in the Melbourne suburb of St Kilda. One hundred and twenty-five years later, St Michael’s Grammar School is one of Australia’s top educational institutions, both utterly modern and deeply connected to its history and traditions. The School’s values, passed down from the founding Sisters, have linked generations of staff and students in a long line of academic excellence and community service.

In this book, Professor Stuart Kells tells the lively story of St Michael’s, celebrating the people and moments that have transformed it from its modest, devout origins through to the innovative K-12 institution it is today. Lavishly illustrated with more than 250 photographs and artefacts from the School’s archives, The Art of Being Different pays tribute to this special place, on the occasion of its 125th anniversary.

THE CONVENT

A CITY FINDS ITS HEART

From nunnery to eatery and cultural epicentre, trace the vibrant history of the national treasure.

What was behind the wall and the wire? The local people knew . fine courtyards . an old swimming pool . dilapidated tennis courts and a remnant garden, now wild and sprawling.

The Abbotsford Convent was this haunted place, left to languish for years after the last of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd had gone. In its prime it had been a school, a refuge, a retreat, a workhouse and a prison-the single largest charitable institution in the southern hemisphere.

In the late 1990s a proposed high-density development threatened the idyllic riverside location, sparking outrage in the local community and further afield. Years of protesting, negotiating and fundraising followed and the convent, now on Australia’s National Heritage List, has started a new life as a vibrant centre for art and culture.

The Convent: A City Finds its Heart tells the story of the site’s rich history and the efforts to preserve it. It is an uplifting tale of community activism-a tangible reminder that the magic of the past can endure and what people-power can achieve.

 SHAKESPEARE’S LIBRARY

UNLOCKING THE GREATEST MYSTERY IN LITERATURE

An exploration of the quest to find the personal library of the world’s most famous author.

Millions of words of scholarship have been expended on the world’s most famous author and his work. And yet a critical part of the puzzle, Shakespeare’s library, is a mystery. For four centuries people have searched for it: in mansions, palaces and libraries; in riverbeds, sheep pens and partridge coops; and in the corridors of the mind. Yet no trace of the bard’s manuscripts, books or letters has ever been found.

The search for Shakespeare’s library is much more than a treasure hunt. The library’s fate has profound implications for literature, for national and cultural identity, and for the global Shakespeare industry. It bears upon fundamental principles of art, identity, history, meaning and truth.

Unfolding the search like the mystery story that it is, acclaimed author Stuart Kells follows the trail of the hunters, taking us through different conceptions of the library and of the man himself. Entertaining and enlightening, Shakespeare’s Library is a captivating exploration of one of literature’s most enduring enigmas.

Ian D. Gow and Stuart Kells | The Big Four: The Curious Past and Perilous Future of the Global Accounting Monopoly

THE BIG FOUR

THE CURIOUS PAST AND PERILOUS FUTURE OF THE GLOBAL ACCOUNTING MONOPOLY

Across the globe, the so-called Big Four accounting and audit firms – Deloitte, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Ernst & Young, and KPMG – are massively influential. Together, they earn more than US$100 billion annually and employ almost one million people. In many profound ways, they have changed how we work, how we manage, how we invest and how we are governed.

Stretching back centuries, their history is a fascinating story of wealth, power and luck. But today, the Big Four face an uncertain future – thanks to their push into China; their vulnerability to digital disruption and competition; and the hazards of providing traditional services in a new era of transparency.

Both colourful and authoritative, this account of the past, present and likely future of the Big Four is essential reading for anyone perplexed or fascinated by professional services, working in the industry, contemplating joining a professional services firm, or simply curious about the fate of the global economy.

AUTHORS: Ian D. Gow and Stuart Kells

Stuart Kells | The Library: A Catalogue of Wonders

THE LIBRARY

A CATALOGUE OF WONDERS

A LOVE LETTER TO LIBRARIES AND TO THEIR MAKERS AND PROTECTORS

Libraries are filled with magic. From the Bodleian, the Folger and the Smithsonian to the fabled libraries of middle earth, Umberto Eco’s mediaeval library labyrinth and libraries dreamed up by John Donne, Jorge Luis Borges and Carlos Ruiz Zafón, Stuart Kells explores the bookish places, real and fictitious, that continue to capture our imaginations.

The Library: A Catalogue of Wonders is a fascinating and engaging exploration of libraries as places of beauty and wonder. It’s a celebration of books as objects and an account of the deeply personal nature of these hallowed spaces by one of Australia’s leading bibliophiles.

Shortlisted, NSW Premier’s History Awards: General History Prize, 2018

Longlisted, Nib Waverley Library Literary Award, 2018

Penguin and the Lane Brothers: The Untold Story of a Publishing Revolution

PENGUIN AND THE LANE BROTHERS

THE UNTOLD STORY OF A PUBLISHING REVOLUTION

An intimate partnership of three brothers – Allen, Richard and John Lane – lay at the heart of Penguin Books, the twentieth century’s greatest publishing house. In a spirit of daring and creative opposition, the brothers issued quality books on a massive scale and at minuscule prices – and achieved a revolution in publishing. The Lane boys did their best thinking together in bathroom board meetings, where at least one director would always be ‘mother naked’. They innovated in countless ways – in the early years, a church crypt served as their office and warehouse. Penguin was an unconventional upstart, bringing literary giants such as Agatha Christie, George Bernard Shaw, Virginia Woolf and Graham Greene to vast new audiences, and it seemed unstoppable.

Yet the 1942 death of John Lane brought the troika to a halt. Allen, the enthusiastic frontman who relied on his younger brothers to drive Penguin’s success, became more erratic and suspicious over time. Ultimately, he would force Richard out of the company he had cofounded and built. A portrait of a remarkable family and a publishing powerhouse, Penguin and the Lane Brothers also explores the little known story of Richard Lane – the heart and backbone of Penguin, and its strongest influence. Richard’s experiences as a youth in Australia shaped his character and outlook; his dedication to the business was matched only by his devotion to his brothers. Relying on unprecedented access to Lane family sources, including Richard’s Barwell diaries, Penguin and the Lane Brothers sheds new light on the relationship of Allen, Richard and John, so crucial as a driver of Penguin’s spirit and success. By turns hilarious and tragic, moving and insightful, this is a groundbreaking counter-history of an unlikely publishing triumph.